Parents of student-athletes living in Massachusetts often worry about their children getting injured. Individuals who play full contact sports like football have to be especially careful because they run a higher risk of sustaining a head or brain injury.  Frequent headaches may be an indicator of a more serious injury.

This was the case for one freshmen football player. His mother took him to see a local pediatrician after he complained of headaches and nausea. He was first diagnosed with a virus. However, the headaches and nausea continued. A CT scan was ordered later in hopes of finding the reason for the headaches, and it revealed a cystic lesion.

The lesion was later confirmed to be an arachnoid cyst, which is a pocket of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain that may cause seizures or headaches. After this diagnosis, the boy was placed on concussion protocol for five days. Even though the young athlete’s symptoms persisted after the five days were up, the doctor allegedly cleared him to continue playing full-contact sports.

During the following week, the freshman continued to play football and was injured during a game. The cyst ruptured after he was hit while carrying the football. As a result, the boy underwent emergency surgery but was left with permanent traumatic brain injury.

Student-athletes and their parents know that there is a risk of injury when playing sports. A minor brain injury can cause permanent damage if not treated properly early on. Massachusetts residents who believe they have grounds to file a medical malpractice case may consider consulting an attorney. 

Source: muskogeephoenix.com, “Lawsuit against Muskogee doctor alleges negligence“, Wendy Burton, Sept. 28, 2017